The Power of Dreams
www.mydrsy.com

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The Power of Dreams
Jerry Gifford
Will Give Live Seminars
Dreams & Dream Interpretation

Fri & Sat at Noon & 2PM

Sept.19-22, 2013    visit Website for more information

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Classical Plot of the Hero Journey
For a more detailed description read Monomyth: The Basic Patterns of the Hero Journey {includes The Monomyth in Film videos}


What is Arch Plot and Classic Design?

Arch plot is a goal-oriented plot where, “for better or worse, an event throws a character’s life out of balance, arousing in him the conscious and/or unconscious desire for that which he feels will restore balance, launching him on a Quest for his Object of Desire against forces of antagonism (inner, personal, extra-personal). He may or may not achieve it” (McKee, 196). Film examples of arch plot include: Toy Story, The Godfather, Back to the Future, Star Wars, Etc. (Most American Hollywood films use arch plot). Book examples of arch plot include: Harry Potter (Rowling), Hunger Games (Collins), Speak (Anderson), Pride & Prejudice (Austen), Hamlet (Shakespeare), The Odyssey (Homer), etc.

A story that uses classic design has eleven basic story sections. Depending on which books you read these story beats all have different titles. I’ve culled the information below from a variety of different sources, each of whom give arch plot design their own title (i.e. classic plot, the hero’s journey, etc.), but at its core they’re all talking about the same design. For the major sequences and beats, the header titles use Joseph Campbell and Christopher Vogler’s Hero’s Journey terminology, and under that you’ll see a list of the same beat termed differently by others. Thus, what Campbell calls the Call to Action, McKee calls the Inciting Incident, and Blake Snyder calls The Catalyst....continued below image

ACT ONE

The Ordinary World: The hero’s life is established in his ordinary world.

This story beat is also known as:


Call to Adventure: Something changes in the hero’s life to cause him to take action.

This story beat is also known as:


Refusal of the Call: The hero refuses to take action hoping his life with go back to normal. Which it will not.

Also known as:


Crossing the First Threshold: The hero is pushed to a point of no return where he must answer the call and begin his journey.

Also known as:



ACT TWO

Tests, Allies, and Enemies: The journey through the special world is full of tests and obstacles that challenge the hero emotionally and/or physically.

Also known as:


Mid-Point: The energy of the story shifts dramatically. New information is discovered (for positive or negative) that commits the hero to his journey.

Also known as:


Approaching Inmost Cave: The hero gets closer to reaching his goal and must prepare for the upcoming battle (emotional or physical).

Also known as:


Inmost Cave: The hero hits rock bottom. He fails miserably and must come to face his deepest fear. This causes self-revelation.

Also known as:



ACT THREE

Final Push: The hero makes a new plan to achieve his goal.

Also known as:


Seizing the Sword: The hero faces his foe in a final climactic battle. The information learned during the crisis is essential to beating this foe.

Also known as:


Return with the Elixir: The hero returns home with the fruits of his adventure. He begins his life as a changed person, now living in the “new ordinary world”.

Also known as:



“I took a master class with Billy Wilder once and he said that in the first act of a story you put your character up in a tree and the second act you set the tree on fire and then in the third you get him down.” – Gary Kurtz (Film Producer)


From Ingrid's Notes … musings on creative writing and craft …